Rick Santorum: We go to Church, they don’t, we are the party that believes in values

March 3, 2012
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Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum while talking with Bill Cunningham on WLW in Cincinatti, said, “Look at every race that’s been run over the past forty, thirty years, and you will see a divide between George Bush and Al Gore, between George Bush and John Kerry, between John McCain and Barack Obama, between people who go to church and people who don’t.” Santorum went on to say, “We are the party that believe in values.” Going to church does not make one a Christian or a person of values but far be it for reality to get in the way of talking points.

 

With all of the obvious deflection used in recent days in an attempt to take our minds off of the recovering economy and because Republicans have no viable candidate to run against President Obama, one talking point is still being echoed. Sadly.

The President’s supposed ‘war on religion’ is absurd and with the resurrection of birtherism very recently rearing its crazy head, perhaps they’re both linked. How can a Kenyan socialist, Marxist, Maoist, Usurper be a Christian after all?

It’s obvious each candidate is trying to out-Conservative the other – now they’re trying to out-church us utilizing that all too familiar stereotypical broad paintbrush.

President Rick Santorum states, “We are the party that believe in values.”

 

I’ve had a change of heart; perhaps there is a war on religion, as long as it’s not a Republican’s religion, the war is on but I suggest the right wing fired the first shot in this battle.

By values, Santorum must mean to demonize an entire group of people which historically is his forte.

FYI: I am a proud leftist Christian who accepts and embraces every race, sex and religion. Santorum should try accepting others sometime.

 

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  • Fancy

    You are wrong Mr. Santorum. Democrats go to church too.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_RS2W5V2OVEEXI6PUPMI3FKRF7A ME

    And to be straight here, I’m not saying that all people that go to church either have any values or only have values because they’re afraid. Some are just good people for the sake of being decent people…. I’m just saying that Santorum’s sanctimonious reasons are less genuine than those of an atheist who is a humanist.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_RS2W5V2OVEEXI6PUPMI3FKRF7A ME

    What a jerk. Having values and NOT believing in god is more valuable than only being a moral person because you’re afraid of god. Being a good person just because it’s the right thing to do and not because you’re afraid of going to hell is a lot less self-serving and far more genuine.

  • Jjjj

    we need Ethics in government, NOT religion-

  • SupportOurTroops2012

    I find it sad that articles like this (originating from stupid statements like the ones Santorum has made) seem to only bring out two types of folks to comment: Those Christians who want to defend the fact that they are not like Santorum (which only makes sense, and I would do the same thing)…and the folks who feel it is now their duty to write hateful things about Christianity–as if this idiot speaks for all Christians. He doesn’t even speak for 10% of Christians, I’d wager (and even if he did, it would still be irrelevant to my point). People are people, and they shouldn’t EVER all be lumped into groups to be deified or crucified. Period.

    If 51 out of 100 individuals in a particular ethnic group choose to steal and 49 don’t, do you have the right to think that this group has a propensity to steal? Well, yes, that’s your right, if you want to be an idiot. Now, on to the real question: Would that point of view be justified by logic and reason and founded in a rudimentary understanding of individualism and free will? Well, of course not. What if it’s 90 out of 100 folks in an ethnic group? Who’s critically thinking out there? :)

    I am not a Christian. I am not an Atheist. But I have tons of friends who are both. I am not Caucasian nor Asian…I am not a male…I have a graduate degree, and I have friends who didn’t have the opportunity to finish high school. I think you get my drift. Collectivism in all its forms is an extremely immature view of humanity and its history (much less, its future). So, to those who want to attack others (regardless of who is perceived to have thrown the first stone): Grow up already. Live and let live–regardless of your perspective, everyone has the right to choose how and what to think and how to live life, provided that it doesn’t negatively impact the lives of others (and being annoyed with someone else’s lifestyle doesn’t count as “negative impact”…in those cases, you just need a good healthly dose of MYOB.).

    P.S. – If you want to rail on how Christianity–all big and bad and by itself (ancient or modern and regardless of any knowledge on human nature) is THE scourge of humanity–perhaps you should delve a little deeper than that…your understanding of history is just a wee bit thin, and you need to broaden your view. A very good (entertaining and vastly informative) novel to read: “Creation” by Gore Vidal. Start there and keep on going! You’ll be glad you understand Zoroastrianism, among other things. ;)

    • http://profiles.google.com/writerwriter1 Writer Writer

      Religion, not specifically christianity, is a problem. Blind adherence to any form of it or other dogmatism, is a problem. Believing in things that are demonstrably NOT real – and forming policy based on those things – is a problem.

      • guest

        The problem isn’t religion… the problem is people being so blind and stubborn with their own beliefs that they’re unable to even consider another point of view. Extremism on both sides is going to be the downfall of this country. If we want to survive as a great nation, we have to learn to get along. Christians, Muslims, atheists, agnostics… if we act like stubborn, petulant children, maybe we deserve to fall.

    • http://profiles.google.com/writerwriter1 Writer Writer

      Religion, not specifically christianity, is a problem. Blind adherence to any form of it or other dogmatism, is a problem. Believing in things that are demonstrably NOT real – and forming policy based on those things – is a problem.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Thomas-Zell/31110369 Thomas Zell

    He’s not a good catholic at all, he’s a climate change denier. He ignores parts of church doctrine that are politically inconvenient.

    • http://profiles.google.com/writerwriter1 Writer Writer

      As do ALL religious people. If you’re a christian and male and you shave, you’re cherry picking yourself.

  • Utilityprince

    Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. Ron Paul is the only candidate with a difference. All the rest, Republican and Democrat alike, are part of the problem in the U.S.A., along with the corporate lobbyists who own them.

  • WriterWriter1

    Really? Values? Does Santorum mean biblical value like those outlined in Deuteronomy and Leviticus? Y’know, the part where a woman who is raped must marry her attacker? Or the one where you’re supposed to let the townspeople stone your ‘unruly’ children? Or the bible that tells us that god is responsible for genocide and murders numbering over 2.5 million? Or the bible that not only encourages slavery, expects it? THAT church?

    SCREW YOU Santorum. Those are not ‘values.’

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